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Ecstasy News Headlines

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  • Ecstasy overdose claims another life

  • Ecstasy abuse increasing again in many areas

  • Learn the effects of ecstasy and how to treat symptoms

  • Abuse of ecstasy and similar drugs carries major risks

  • Drug rehabilitation needed to recover from ecstasy toll

  • Ecstasy abuse damages mind and body, requires treatment

  • Increase in deaths involving ecstasy show need for rehabs that work

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    Ecstasy Addiction
    HopelessnessAddiction to ecstasy can not only wear down the body and cause serious damage, but it can be fatal. Ecstasy use can cause long-lasting damage to brain areas critical for thought and memory. A findings from a study from Johns Hopkins and the National Institute of Mental Health now suggest that ecstasy use may lead to impairments in other cognitive functions besides memory, such as the ability to reason verbally or sustain attention. Researchers are continuing to examine the effects of chronic ecstasy use on memory and other functions in which serotonin has been implicated, such as mood, impulse control, and sleep cycles.
    The designer drug ecstasy, or MDMA users may encounter problems similar to those experienced by amphetamine and cocaine users, including addiction. Narconon of Oklahoma indicates that in addition to its rewarding effects, MDMA's psychological effects can include confusion, depression, sleep problems, anxiety, and paranoia during, and sometimes weeks after, taking the drug. Physical effects can include muscle tension, involuntary teeth clenching, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, and chills or sweating. Increases in heart rate and blood pressure are a special risk for people with circulatory or heart disease. Ecstasy-related fatalities at raves have been reported. The stimulant effects of the drug, which enable the user to dance for extended periods, combined with the hot, crowded conditions usually found at raves can lead to dehydration, hyperthermia, and heart or kidney failure. MDMA use damages brain serotonin neurons. Serotonin is thought to play a role in regulating mood, memory, sleep, and appetite. Recent research indicates heavy MDMA use causes persistent memory problems in humans.


    If you need help with an Ecstasy addiction, call (877) 340-3602
     

    There has been some disagreements on whether Ecstasy is addictive. For some people, ecstasy can be addictive according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. A survey of young adult and adolescent esctasy users found that 43 percent of those who reported ecstasy use met the accepted diagnostic criteria for dependence, as evidenced by continued use despite knowledge of physical or psychological harm, withdrawal effects, and tolerance (or diminished response). These results are consistent with those of similar studies in other countries that also suggest a high rate of ecstasy dependence among users. Ecstasy abstinence-associated withdrawal symptoms include fatigue, loss of appetite, depressed feelings, and trouble concentrating.
     The false idea that a person only feels good with ecstasy leads to a desire to take it more often than just at raves and techno parties; 67% of those who use the drug want to continue taking it, despite having bad experiences. And regardless of its addictive properties, people often try other drugs which are even more dangerous and do cause the user to become addicted.
     
    The Life Cycle and Mechanics of Addiction

    By Gary W. Smith

    Executive Director
    Narconon Arrowhead


    Whether a person is genetically or bio-chemically predisposed to addiction or alcoholism is a controversy that has been debated for years within the scientific, medical and chemical dependency communities. One school of thought advocates the “disease concept” which embraces the notion that addiction is an inherited disease, and that the individual is permanently ill at a genetic level, even for those experiencing long periods of sobriety.

    Another philosophy argues that addiction is a dual problem consisting of a physical and mental dependency on chemicals, compounded by a pre-existing mental disorder (i.e., clinical depression, bipolar disorder or some other mental illness), and that the mental disorder needs to be treated first as the primary cause of the addiction.

    A third philosophy subscribes to the idea that chemical dependency leads to permanent “chemical imbalances” in the neurological system that must be treated with psychotropic medications after the person has withdrawn from their drug of choice.

    The fact remains that there is some scientific research that favors each of these addiction concepts, but none of them are absolute. Based on national averages, addiction treatment has a 16% to 20% recovery rate. The message is pretty clear that these theories are just that, theories, and we have a lot more to learn if we are to bring the national recovery rate to a more desirable level.

    There is a fourth school of thought which has proven to be more accurate. It has to do with the life cycle of addiction. This data is universally applicable to addiction, no matter which hypothesis is used to explain the phenomenon of chemical dependency.

    The life cycle of addiction begins with a problem, discomfort or some form of emotional or physical pain a person is experiencing. The person finds this very difficult to deal with.

    Here is an individual who, like most people in our society, is basically good. He has encountered a problem that is causing him physical or emotional pain and discomfort that he does not have an immediate answer for. Examples would include difficulty “fitting in” as a child or teenager, puberty, physical injuries such a broken bone, a bad back or some other chronic physical condition. Whatever the origin of the difficulty is, the discomfort associated with it presents the individual with a real problem. He feels this problem is a major situation that is persisting. He can see no immediate resolution or relief from it. Most of us have experienced this in our lives to a greater or lesser degree.
    (click here for full article)

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